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How to Make a Fresh Greenery Wreath

Evergreen wreath hanging from a red ribbon on a front door.

If you happen to have an evergreen tree nearby, a few bucks, and about a half hour, I can show you how to make your own beautiful, festive fresh greenery wreath for that front door of yours.

I get that a lot of people don’t have access to evergreen trees to cut off greenery, and that’s probably why the grocery store sells greenery wreaths for a pretty penny, but if you do happen to have a pine or spruce tree that you can clip a few branches from, you can easily make your own. It’s a fun, fast, festive, and frugal craft (my favorite kind). And if you don’t happen to have 30-year-old pine trees like we do, check with your local Christmas tree lot or farm—many of them give away greenery for free!

Evergreen wreath hanging from a red ribbon on a front door.

I’m going to dive right into this tutorial, so let’s get started. Here’s what you’ll need to make your very own fresh greenery wreath.

Supplies

How to Make a Fresh Greenery Wreath
  • 12″ Metal Wreath Form (like this)—You can make a metal wreath form from a wire coat hanger, but honestly, I think it’s worth the $2 to buy a pre-formed one at a craft store (Michaels, Hobby Lobby, and Joann’s all carry them). They are perfectly formed and sized for fresh greenery wreaths and you can use them year after year. A 12″ wreath form might look small, but once the greenery is on it, the wreath will be plenty big for a regular width door.
  • Floral wire (like this)—Green coated is the best (because it’ll be camouflaged in the greenery). Also, if you can find a package that has a built-in cutting tool, you’ll be forever grateful. Again, all the craft stores—and many discount stores—will carry this stuff near their artificial flowers.
  • Fresh greenery cut into 6–12″ sections—Pine, spruce, holly, cedar, magnolia—whatever makes your heart go pitter-patter. I like to use a mix of greenery from different trees around our property.
  • Pine cones, ribbon, and other accoutrements—A simple fresh greenery wreath is beautiful on its own, but if you want to dress up your wreath with pine cones, ribbon, birds’ nests, twine, or bows, you can. We gathered some pine and spruce cones from our trees.

Step One: Make Your First Bundle

Lay out all your supplies in your work area. I like to do this outside so I don’t get pine needles everywhere, but if it’s super cold where you are, you might want to do this in a garage or basement.

MY OTHER RECIPES

Start the wreath by taking a few different boughs of greenery and bunching them together at the base of the branch.

Hand holding evergreen sprigs to place on a wreath form
Take the bundle, and place it against the wreath form. Use your floral wire to wrap around both the bundle and the form a few times, until it feels secure. Do NOT clip the wire when you are finished.
Bundle of evergreen sprigs on top of a wreath form

Step Two: Layer More Bundles

Make a second bundle, and layer it over top of the last bundle, so the fluffy “tail” end of the bundle covers the wire of the first bundle. You’ll probably want to move up the wreath form two inches or so.

Hand holding more fresh greenery to add to a wreath form
Grab the wire, and wrap it around the second bundle and the wreath form until secure. Again, do not cut the wire when you are finished. See how it’s starting to form? The next bundle you add on covers the previous bundle’s wire.

A few bundles of fresh greenery on a wreath form

Step Three: Finish The Wreath

Repeat the process of bundling, covering, and attaching all the way around the wreath.

Fresh greenery being wrapped onto a wreath form
Wreath form almost completely covered in evergreens

Once you get to the last bundle, just tuck the stem/base of branch end under the very first bundle’s greenery. And then take your wire, and wrap it around the base and the wreath form. NOW you can clip your wire.

Hand holding the last bundle of fresh greenery up to a wreath form
And then fluff all the greenery so the wreath looks all nice and full!

Wreath form completely covered in evergreens

Step Four: Decorate

Grab whatever decorations you’d like to add, and attach them using small pieces of floral wire. Like, for example, with my pinecones, I just ran a wire through the pine cone.

Hand holding a pinecone threaded with floral wire
And then placed the pine cone where I wanted, and twisted the wire through the back onto the frame, making sure to tuck the extra wire in the back so it couldn’t be seen from the front.

Hand holding up a fresh greenery wreath The back of a fresh greenery wreath

Do the same thing if you want to add a bow. Tie your bow (or take a pre-tied bow), loop a strand of floral wire through the back, and then tie it onto the wreath form.

Floral wire wrapped around a red ribbon bow Close up of a red bow on a fresh greenery wreath

Step Five: Hang and enjoy!

All that’s left is to hang that baby up! You can just plop the wreath form onto a wreath hanger, or, if you have wood doors, you can do what I do and run a strand of coordinating ribbon through the back of the wreath form.

Hand tying a piece of ribbon to the back of a wreath form

And then use a flat thumbtack to attach that sucker to the very top of your door.

Hand pushing a thumbtack into a ribbon on top of a wooden door

Just make sure to really get the thumbtack flat so the door opens and closes smoothly. Step back and enjoy your beautiful creation!

Evergreen wreath hanging from a red ribbon on a front door of a brick house.

To Care For Your Fresh Greenery Wreath

Hand spritzing a fresh greenery wreath with a spray bottle

Fresh greenery wreaths kept outdoors do a marvelous job of “keeping” well in cooler temperatures. My only recommendation for care would be to spritz it with water every few days to keep the needles from drying out. Honestly, I normally am really good about doing this for the first week I have the wreaths up, but then I fall off the misting wagon and they still look beautiful all the way into the new year. If you live in a warmer climate, you might have a shorter lifespan and need to mist more frequently.

To Reuse Your Wreath Form

Once you are done with your wreath, flip it over and use wire cutters to snip through all the lines of wire on the back. Remove the greenery, wire, and decor, and store the wreath form until next year.

And that’s that! I’ve been doing these fresh greenery wreaths for years, so I’ve gotten pretty speedy at it! Each wreath took me exactly 12 minutes to put together start-to-finish (I timed it like a weirdo), and it took me another 20 minutes or so to gather the greenery, pinecones, and other supplies. Not too shabby!

Close Up of an evergreen wreath hanging from a red ribbon on a front door.

And the best part? I have a TON of fun making my wreaths each year! It’s one of my favorite craft projects on my holiday agenda each December. I do stuff like this because it makes me super happy, but if something like this wouldn’t bring you joy, put down some cash to buy a fresh greenery wreath (or don’t) and go find something else to do that does make your heart sing!

I believe we put too much pressure on ourselves during the holiday season to be the perfect bakers/ crafters/ gift-givers/ philanthropists/ decorators/ hosts/ family members/ friends. It’s impossible to be perfect at everything (or, honestly, anything)! So do the things that you love to do and that bring you joy, and put aside the things that don’t—without an ounce of worry or guilt. That’s my secret to truly enjoying every second of this most glorious of seasons. Happy holidays!
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6 comments

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  • Meghan SAYS

    Perfect timing, Cassie! Thanks! I had just been thinking it would be fun to make my own wreath this year, and bam, you’ve got a tutorial!

  • Andrea SAYS

    Do you have any idea how many feet of wire you use to make one wreath? We are making 42 wreaths and trying to figure out how much wire to buy!

    • Cassie SAYS

      I’m sorry, I don’t! I’ve never measured. I will say that I can get multiple (2-4, depending on size) wreaths out of one of the small rolls of floral wire.

  • Ann SAYS

    Thanks for timing this like a weirdo! We are also making multiples for Christmas bucks, and it’s good to know the time/speed to allow for this project. Of course, you are well-practiced. Maybe we’ll offer incentives for teens who can best your time! Ho ho ho

  • Em SAYS

    Hey Cassie! Your “like this” links don’t seem to be working. I’d love to support you and order through your links. You put so much into Wholefully, it’s the least I can do. :)

    • Julie @ Wholefully SAYS

      Which ones aren’t working for you? They seem to be working on our end, but I can troubleshoot for you if you let me know!

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